More than just entertainment from our childhood, stories are the way we understand and make sense of the world and the things that happen to us. Recent research indicates that the telling of our experiences in powerful and engaging stories is a way to bring a situation into focus and create empathy and shared understanding...

Researchers: Kari Allen-Hammer and Stephanie Shelburne; LiveLifeResources and UNCFoundation

Brief Description: More than just entertainment from our childhood, stories are the way we understand and make sense of the world and the things that happen to us. Recent research indicates that the telling of our experiences in powerful and engaging stories is a way to bring a situation into focus and create empathy and shared understanding. Neuroscience demonstrates that when a story is multidimensional and includes sensory orientation, the teller and listener can experience mirrored brain patterning.  

The skill of storytelling is one that can be cultivated and refined, empowering the teller by building confidence and self-esteem, creating a shared experience that enhances feelings of well-being and health.

This study is looking for female participants between the ages of 30 and above who would like to participate in an 8-week course on Storytelling. In addition to learning about the history of oral tradition and the art of telling story, participants will practice the skill of oration, creative linguistics, poetic and rhythmic spoken word. In the initial weeks participants will identify a meaningful experience to be woven into their story and shared within the participant and researcher community.

Data will be gathered via interview and questionnaire both before the 8-week course and at the culmination. Inquiry will include issues and experiences of health and well-being.

This course will take place in the LiveLifeResources Learning Management platform (LifeWiseU), requiring no travel. Each week will include a live webinar component, arranged once participants are gathered and schedules can be coordinated.

 Contact: For more information about this study, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.